A series of grisly news articles surrounding murders that have happened at Popeye’s restaurants.

Four Rubbings

Below is my submission to an open call at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley.  Even if my work is not selected for the exhibition, I really like the connections I came up with in response. The call seeks artists who

Explore how borders —both atmospheric and conceptual—can be represented in a diverse reach of media."

 

  • “Bay window w/ sportswriter and portable computer”
    Screen print, photodye, charcoal on unprimed canvas | 30 x 24 inches |2 Variations | 2014
  • http://www.feather2pixels.com/wp-content/uploads/variation-c.jpg
    “KCl” | Screen print, charcoal rubbing & dye on unprimed canvas | 4 Unique Variations | 24 x 24 in each | 2014
  • “KCl” | Screen print, charcoal rubbing & dye on unprimed canvas | 4 Unique Variations | 24 x 24 in each | 2014
  • “Uncharted/Unnamed/Untitled”
    Screen print, charcoal rubbing & photodye on industrial canvas | 2 Variations | 32 x 24 in | 2014
  • “H.K. harbour ”
    Screen print on unprimed Canvas| 36×29 in. each | 4 Unique Variations |2013
  • “KCl”
    Screen print, charcoal rubbing & dye on unprimed canvas | 4 Unique Variations | 24 x 24 in each | 2014

These pieces all contain borders as part of the complete image — they are screen printed imprints of pictures, edges included, not just pictures. The goal of this approach is to discover situations in which the reproduction of an image may reveal previously undetected interpretations of the original image. The multifaceted screen printing process offers endless possibilities for those willing to experiment with its mechanical parameters, and this is best done with varying degrees of reverence and resentment towards precision. Discoveries can be made by exploring exceptions that expand the boundaries of concepts:

A regular irregularity.
An irregular regularity.
A printed painting.
A painted print.
A line formed by an absence of a line.

This approach almost always reveals that borders are illusions — they are windows formed by overlapping edges.

Before an image is formed, I devote attention to slowly layering concentrated washes of printer ink, perpetually sanded coatings, and charcoal rubbings of curious textures I’ve gathered. The results form an ideal surface on which to apply an adventurous approach to the materials and methods of industrial screen printing. Thick textile inks can be printed in negative space to approximate the additive color spectrum of pure light, while the magentas and cyans of graphic inks can be diluted to flow though positive spaces like watercolors. Surprisingly little screen printing is required to produce a deep and resonant image.

 

 

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